Six Things to Consider when bringing your Shelter Cat Home

Posted by & filed under Articles, Dr. Nick, Pet Care Advice.

by Dr. Nicholas Dodman

Dr NIcholas Dodman 1. Advance Planning

You certainly don’t want to bring your new cat into your home and suddenly find you are lacking some vital accoutrement, like cat food or litter box. So, to avoid this potential downfall, it is a good idea to make a shopping list before the big day and get all the supplies that you will need ahead of time. On this shopping list should be all the bare necessities of life for your new feline friend, including cat food – preferably food one that she is used to initially – a food bowl, a water bowl (or even better a water fountain), a supply of treats, a warm comfortable cat bed or two, one more litter box than you have cats (so one cat should have access to two litter boxes), cat litter, and two or three tall sturdy scratching posts that are strategically placed for easy access by the cat. A word to the wise, your litter boxes should be 1.5 times the length of the cat, wide enough for him to turn around and deep enough for you can fill the box with four inches of litter without the risk of it overflowing or being kicked out of the box by the cat. The litter should preferably be scoopable, fine particle, unscented litter. And remember, as far as the litter box arrangement goes, that most cats don’t like hoods or liners. Another vital part of the equipment you will need is a cat collar (of the breakaway type) for tags and ID. Even though your cat should be an entirely indoor cat, cats have been known to escape, so proper ID is imperative. You can even get your cat micro chipped but that is an invisible mark so I think a tag with your cat’s name and phone number is a good idea anyway. Lastly, if you have a long-haired cat, you will need some kind of brush to assist with their grooming. Soft slicker brushes are ideal.


2. To Cat Proof Your Home

People who haven’t had cats in their home before might need to consider the kind of mischief that cats sometimes get into. Some of their antics are just mildly aggravating, but others can be frankly dangerous for the cat. In the mildly annoying department, you might want to move valuables and breakable heirlooms from shelves as it is not a rarity for a cat to navigate these interesting platforms either accidentally – or on purpose – knock off your cherished possessions. Also, make sure heating registers are secured, too, as cats may pry them off and disappear down the vent causing you alarm and perhaps inconvenience and expense if you have to dig up the floor to get the cat out. Dental floss, string, and thread should also be squirreled away out of access to the cat. For some reason they love to chew on strings and can wind up with intestinal obstruction. Even dental floss dispensed in an open trash container can prove a fatal attraction for a cat. This firmly places strings and threads in the department of potentially dangerous items. For cats with a tendency to chew on wires, and there are some, loose wires should be bundled and hidden under rugs or protected with a custom-made cable protector. Furthermore, poisonous plants should be removed from the environment – at least, plants toxic to cats. A comprehensive list of such plants can be found on the ASPCA website, ASPCA.org.

Finally, remember that cats like to go into small warm spaces so prepare yourself ahead of time to close the door to the washing machine and dryer and to not allow your cat access to the garage. There are always a few fan belt injuries each year as cats snuggle by the warn engine of a parked car.


3. Enrich the Environment

One of the best environment enrichments for cats is another compatible cat. Compatibility between cats, however, is not guaranteed. Adopting two cats when there is an adversarial relationship between them is far from enrichment. The folk at the shelter may well be able to tell you which cats get on so you can do them both a favor by adopting the pair. It is important to enrich the environment for cats, whether you have one or two of them, because life indoors, though safer, can be pretty dull if an owner is not thinking on behalf of their cat(s). In this respect, interactive toys should be purchased to appeal to a cat’s natural tendency to want to chase and pounce on moving things. Various fishing pole devices with feathers attached to a line make exercising your cat easy, even from an armchair. And cats definitely do need exercise – at least thirty minutes daily – which you should encourage through these interactive games. A laser pointer (laser mouse cat toy) can be good fun as your cat chases the laser image of a mouse round a baseboard and up the wall. Next, food puzzles and interactive food toys or balls are helpful to entertain your kitty when you can’t be around. Something as simple as a table tennis ball with a hole drilled in it with a piece of delicious cat treat inside will work wonders on a smooth surface. Another thing cats like is places to hide so the provision of boxes and bags and other spaces into which they can curl themselves up is good to satisfy the cat within. Even a large cardboard tube can be a good hiding place. Moving on, cats are three dimensional animals and do not live solely on the two dimensions that is your floor. They like elevated surfaces and, in this respect, cat condos and climbing frames are excellent.

Window sill cat seats are not only helpful in this regard but allow the cat the opportunity to gaze out of the window at things going on outside. You can arrange a bird feeder outside the window so that the cat has entertainment – “bird TV” – during daylight hours. For windowless, bird-less environments, cat videos can be purchased of birds flying around or rodents running on wheels. Some cats enjoy watching these videos. A final enrichment strategy would be to appeal to the cat’s sense of taste and smell. Some cats respond well to fresh catnip or cat grass grown especially for them (please verify that it is non-toxic cat grass). Not all cats respond to catnip but, for the ones that do, catnip-stuffed toys can provide occasional fun, too. Other scents cats might enjoy include lavender or valerian. Some even enjoy lettuce or green beans.


4. The Day of Travel

Remember that cats are not the best at traveling and many will shriek or scream and have a hideous experience in transit. To ease the cat’s woes during the car ride from the shelter to your home, it is best to use a well-padded, soft flexible carrier that a passenger in the backseat of the car nurses in her arms. During the ride, the passenger can “bill and coo” to the cat in encouraging tones and possibly see if the cat might accept a delicious food treat. Meanwhile the driver takes the low road – the most direct, uncurvy route from A to B to bring the cat home. The high road may be quicker, with all its twists and turns, but that will make the experience less well tolerated by the cat. On arriving home, the cat should be released into a quiet area, a “home room” so to speak that has been set up with all the modern conveniences that I refer to above. As a rule of thumb, it is a good idea to give a cat a couple of days to settle down before allowing him into the house as a whole but that depends a bit on the cat. Some cats are quite confident, are active and curious, and may want to explore earlier. Others are more reclusive and might prefer to hide for more than a day or two before they venture out. For these latter shrinking violets, the issue should not be forced. Food treats and tincture of time are best for these Nervous Nells.


5. Introductions to Other Animals and People in the Home

Family members should be allowed to meet the cat in a low-key, relatively unobtrusive fashion bearing gifts in the form of cat treats or interactive toys. They should probably sit down in the “home room,” spend time, and disperse treats and toys. If they don’t get through to the cat first time around they should not worry because they will break through in time. With other animals, introductions can be a little trickier depending on the personalities involved. Certainly, two cats should not be allowed direct access to each other too soon unless they are happy and purring – and definitely not hissing – on either side of a closed door. If things seem to be going well the door can be cracked an inch (and secured) so they can catch a glimpse of each other. The next stage might be a screen followed by supervised introductions in the same room if things are going well. Of course, if cats are naturally friendly to each other, this process can proceed fairly quickly. With other cats, it’s not quite such an expeditious process. Dogs, too, need to be introduced gradually t cats with the dog on leash and the cat in a carrier, just to see how the two interact. Only when things are truly peaceful would they be allowed together, initially under very close supervision.


6. Arrange a Vet Visit As Soon As You Can

It’s certainly an important measure to find a convenient and compatible veterinarian for your cat as soon as possible. Within the first couple of days of the cat’s arrival is best. A house call veterinarian would be ideal for a cat but there aren’t that many around. Just a meet and greet with the veterinarian might be in order of business, perhaps with a quick vet-check of the eyes, mouth and evaluation of heart sounds and respiration. Noting more invasive first time around. How much you might need to be done eventually depends on what has already been done at the shelter. In some cases, worming may be necessary and vaccinations may have to be updated. Also, unless these tests have already been performed, it is a good idea to ask for a blood test to check for the presence of feline leukemia virus (FELV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Unless these tests have already been done they should be done, especially if you have – or plan to have – other cats.

With all these measures in place there is a very good chance that you have just acquired a wonderful feline friend who will provide you with entertainment, companionship, and general enrichment for your whole family. There is nothing like sharing your home with another species to broaden the mind, reduce stress, and provide a happier, healthier home for all concerned. I know my Griswald – pictured above – has never looked back since his adoption and he has provided us with endless hours of entertainment – plus amusing himself knocking a few ornaments off shelves and signing his John Hancock on much of the furniture. But we love him. Happy cat, happy home.


Dr. Nicholas Dodman is a Professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine and Director of the school’s Animal Behavior Clinic. He is also Chief Scientific Officer for the CENTER FOR CANINE BEHAVIOR STUDIES (centerforcaninebehaviorstudies.org). He has written over 100 scientific articles and several popular press books, including The Dog Who Loved Too Much and The Cat Who Cried for Help.

Submissive Urination

Posted by & filed under Articles, Dr. Nick, Pet Care Advice.

by Dr. Nicholas Dodman

Dr NIcholas Dodman

… a wee problem that is oh so easy to fix

When I adopted my dog Rusty from a shelter at age 8 months it didn’t take me 5 minutes to recognize that he was a submissive urinator. When he greeted me, my wife, or strangers at the door, he would wiggle like a worm – in pure pleasure – as he dribbled urine in interesting and extensive patterns on the hardwood floor. I knew what that meant – it was really a great compliment; a sign of excitement and flat out respect – but peeing on greeting was not a routine I relished.

Having to get down on your knees and mop up urine every time I came home – or someone came to my house – became quite tedious after a surprisingly short time. Enough already, I was thought to myself and implemented the program outlined below. Sure I was happy to be his fearless master, (in his mind) one to be worshiped and kowtowed to, but I did not want or need such extreme supplication every time I came home.

Submissive urination is a behavior problem that some people just can’t or won’t tolerate. It can even lead to dogs being surrendered to a shelter – or returned post-adoption – yet is so simple to fix. Failing to recognize it for what it is – an annoying compliment – can cause owners much grief and frustration.

Some owners yell at their dog for doing it, which actually makes the situation worse. The dogs thinks, I obviously did not grovel enough to “he who must be obeyed” so next time I will make a better job of it – I’ll up my game. A vicious cycle thus results and perpetuates the problem. One woman friend I knew at my gym had tried the yelling approach with no luck (of course). She then went to her local vet and was told to put the dog on antibiotics (pointless). Then the dog was given a second course of antibiotics – still no joy (and no surprise there).

So she switched vets. The next vet told her that her dog could have a “plumbing problem” (anatomic issue) and needed fancy radiographic testing to find out what was going on. Some $6000 later, the dog was still urinating each time anyone approached him and the woman was getting really frustrated and was almost to the point of giving up on her dog. I told her that it was submissive urination when she described what her dog was doing and told her what to do. “Why didn’t you make an appointment to see me,” I asked. “Because you’re too expensive,” was her reply. Sigh. I reminded her that there is no such thing as cheap or expensive, just good value and bad value. Luckily for the dog, the problem was resolved in short order, as was my dog Rusty’s.


Here how to deal with it:

1. Do not walk directly toward the dog when entering the home or approaching it. Rather take a circuitous path and become seated as soon as possible until the excitement associated with your entrance has lessened.

2. Do not look directly into the dogs eyes as direct eye contact is often construed as a challenge or threat by a dog. Instead look past the dog into the room as you sail by on your circuitous path like an ocean-going schooner.

3. Do not lean or loom over the dog as this action constitutes a challenge. Remain upright and simply ignore the little feller. No bending at the waist, no petting, no outstretched hand to sniff.

4. Do not reach for the dog’s collar or scruff. That will really intimidate the “you-know-what” out of him. If you wish to apprehend him, pre-attach a “drag line” (a.k.a. a light-weight, loop-less training leash) so you can pick up the leash without looming over him. You might have to choose the right moment to attach the drag line so as to avoid inciting an incident. Do it when he is relaxed and comfortable or call him to you when you are seated. One owner had to walk backward to their dog, crouching at the same time, to avoid his dog having an accident.

5. Build your dog’s confidence. I do this using what I call a “reverse dominance program.” This program entails NO punishment at all (the dog can do no wrong), positive reinforcement training, free-choice feeding, and encouraging interactive games, like tug of war, which you allow the dog to win.

6. For really tough cases, medicines to tighten bladder sphincters can be employed (similar to the ones used to treat bed wetting in children) so that leaking urine is less likely.

A word of caution about the tug of war strategy: You can go too far with it. I once treated a young female cocker spaniel exhibiting submissive urination using that very approach. The good news was that it worked – problem solved. The no-so-good news was that I failed to tell her to quit tug of war once the problem had resolved. The net result was that her dog became overconfident and became quite demanding. Too much of a good thing, I suppose.

Dogs that engage in submissive urination are usually often some of the very best pets to own – once the problem has been addressed. Engaging in this over-the-top display of deference to people implies that the dog has a sensitive nature and will often become a loving family member.

Submissive urination should never be interpreted as an act of defiance, because it’s not. Quite the reverse, in fact. It’s clearly not the same as routine house soiling — when dogs have simply not been properly trained to “go” outside. And can’t be trained away using the usual “house breaking” methods. I saw a cartoon that explained submissive urination in a nutshell. The drawing showed a dog on the psychiatrist’s couch saying, “If I’m being honest with myself, they’re not really accidents.” And that’s the way it is with submissive urination – no accident, just sending a signal of respect and deference.


Dr. Nicholas Dodman is a Professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine and Director of the school’s Animal Behavior Clinic. He is also Chief Scientific Officer for the CENTER FOR CANINE BEHAVIOR STUDIES (centerforcaninebehaviorstudies.org). He has written over 100 scientific articles and several popular press books, including The Dog Who Loved Too Much and The Cat Who Cried for Help.

Whole Food Supplements

Posted by & filed under Articles, Halo, Pet Care Advice.

Dr Donna Spector

What are pet supplements?

Pet supplements are food or food nutrients which are taken orally in order to provide a health benefit, either for prevention or treatment of disease.

My pet’s food is supplemented with vitamins and minerals. Is there benefit from additional supplementation?

During the normal processing of pet foods, many natural vital nutrients found in whole foods are damaged or destroyed. For this reason, most pet foods are supplemented or fortified with vitamins and minerals to replace the nutrients stripped during processing. This supplementation is necessary in order to create complete and balanced pet foods.

Additional pet supplements, together with a complete and balanced natural pet food, may improve longevity and improve the quality of life in an aging animal. Aging pets commonly experience degenerative organ changes in the musculoskeletal system, gastrointestinal tract, skin, heart, lungs, kidneys, liver, nervous system and the specialized organs of sense such as hearing and sight. It may be possible to slow these degenerative changes and decrease the incidence of disease development by the appropriate use of supplements.

What are whole food supplements?

Whole foods are foods which are unprocessed and unrefined (or only minimally so) before being consumed. These include foods such as fresh vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, seeds and whole grains.

Whole food supplements are made by concentrating these foods for use in supplements.

Whole food supplements supply a pet’s body with naturally occurring nutrients they are not getting from their complete and balanced processed diets. Each individual whole food supplement is a unique combination of active substances. When taken together they have whole body effects that are far greater than would be expected from the additive effects of their individual components. When processed correctly, whole food supplements supply superior nutrition over synthetic vitamin and mineral supplements.

What are the benefits of giving whole food supplements to a dog or cat?

Key benefits of whole food supplements:

  • Whole foods provide a variety of complex and inter-related nutrients and micronutrients that a pet’s body needs—such as vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, enzymes, coenzymes, and phytochemicals. Whole foods have lower amounts of nutrients but still exert powerful effects because of the complex relationship between nutrients.
  • The amounts of nutrients found in whole foods are balanced so they do not interfere with each other’s digestion, absorption or metabolism.
  • Whole fruits and vegetables provide naturally occurring protective substances like phytochemicals and antioxidants. These substances may be protective against chronic diseases and help the body to heal itself from normal daily damage.
  • Whole foods provide a valuable source of dietary fiber which is commonly lacking in adequate amounts in many pet foods.

Synthetic vitamins or vitamins isolated from natural foods do not have the accompanying cofactors and enzymes to exert synergistic effects like complex whole foods do. Without this, synthetic vitamins must be delivered in much higher dosages to achieve a similar result and research has proven they still fall short of the effects from whole food supplementation.

 

ABOUT HALO, PURELY FOR PETS® 
For over 30 years, Halo, Purely for Pets® has created holistic pet products of uncompromising quality. Halo, America’s Best Loved Holistic Brand, believes nutrition is the single most important factor in the quality of a pet’s life. Our holistic diets use only real meats, never meat meal of any kind. Plus, when you choose Halo, we feed it forward, donating a bowl to shelters every time you buy — over 1.5 million bowls annually, in partnership with Freekibble.com. Halo sponsors the Humane Society of the United States, GreaterGood.org, and many more animal rescue efforts. Halo’s natural dog food, natural cat food, treats, supplements and grooming products are available at Petco, Sprouts, PetSmart Canada, and other fine pet specialty and natural food stores.

Feeding both Halo canned and dry formulas

Posted by & filed under Articles, Halo, Pet Care Advice.

I recommend that pets eat a combination of dry and canned food every day.  Their bodies are made of 75% water.  Some pets rarely drink enough water to support excellent hydration and organ function so I recommend at least 25% of a pet’s daily calories come from canned food.   

Should you want to mix Halo wet and dry food for your pet daily or occasionally, below are suggestions for balanced proportions providing extra hydration and variety without over feeding.

dog
 

1/4 cup
Wholesome Lamb

lamb dry dog

replace with

4 oz.
Wholesome
Lamb

lamb can dog
 

1/4 cup
Wild
Salmon

dry salmon dog replace with

4 oz.
Succulent
Salmon

dog salmon wet
 

1/4 cup
Wholesome Chicken

dry chicken dog replace with

5.5oz 
Wholesome Chicken

dog chicken wet
 

1/4 cup
Grain-free
Hearty Surf n’ Turf

dog surf n turf dry replace with

3 oz.
Grain-free
Spot’s Choice
Turkey & Chickpea

dog turkey chickpea wet
 

1/4 cup
Small Breed Chicken

small breed chicken dry replace with

5.5 oz.
Wholesome Chicken

dog chicken wet

 

cat
 

1/4 cup
Wholesome Chicken

cat chicken dry replace with

4.5 oz.
Wholesome Chicken

can chicken cat
 

1/4 cup
Wild Salmon

cat dry salmon replace with

4 oz.
Succulent Salmon

cat salmon wet
 

1/4 cup
Wholesome Turkey

cat turkey dry replace with

4.5 oz.
Wholesome Turkey

can turkey wet
 

1/4 cup
Grain-Free
Hearty Chicken

cat chicken grain free dry replace with

4.5 oz.
Wholesome Chicken

cat chick wet
 

1/4 cup
Grain-Free
Hearty Chicken

cat chicken grain free dry replace with

3 oz.
Spot’s Pate Chicken

can pate chicken cat
 

1/4 cup
Seafood Medley

cat seafood medley dry replace with

4 oz.
Spot’s Pate Whitefish

can pate whitefish cat


Note: Feeding both dry and canned Halo formulations is not necessary to meet a pet’s daily nutritional needs. This recommendation represents Halo’s feeding preference for optimal pet health.

ABOUT HALO, PURELY FOR PETS®
For over 30 years, Halo, Purely for Pets® has created holistic pet products of uncompromising quality. Halo, America’s Best Loved Holistic Brand, believes nutrition is the single most important factor in the quality of a pet’s life. Our holistic diets use WHOLE meat, never "meat meal" of any kind. Plus, when you choose Halo, we feed it forward, donating a bowl to shelters every time you buy — over 1.5 million bowls annually, in partnership with Freekibble.com. Halo sponsors the Humane Society of the United States, GreaterGood.org, and many more animal rescue efforts. Halo’s natural dog food, natural cat food, treats, supplements and grooming products are available at Petco, Sprouts, PetSmart Canada, other fine pet specialty and natural food stores, Amazon.com and Chewy.com.

Petco Foundation Announces Winners of Holiday Wishes Grant Campaign

Posted by & filed under News Releases.

$500,000 in grants awarded to 33 animal welfare organizations across the United States,
Animal Alliance of New Jersey receives $100,000 grand prize

Holiday Wishes


SAN DIEGO (Dec. 10, 2014) – Today, the Petco Foundation in partnership with Halo, Purely for Pets, announced the winners of its second annual holiday grant campaign, Holiday Wishes, designed to help the most dedicated animal welfare organizations succeed in their mission to save pets’ lives – at the holidays, and year round.

Animal Alliance of New Jersey in Lambertville, N.J., was announced as the grand prize winner, and presented with a $100,000 grant to support its mission to save animal lives. The organization was also awarded with a pet food donation of 10,000 meals from Freekibble.com and Halo, in partnership with the Petco Foundation.

The Petco Foundation chose the Alliance as the grand prize winner for its story about Hercules, a pit bull puppy who was found at only four-months-old after an act of cruelty covered him in accelerant and lit him on fire, leaving him with burns covering more than 75 percent of his body. Animal Alliance of New Jersey gave Hercules two months of round-the-clock intensive care and treatment as his second and third degree burns put him at risk for life-threatening infections. Hundreds of applications were received from animal advocates hoping to adopt Hercules, but the perfect fit turned out to be the veterinarian that cared for him around-the-clock. Hercules now lives happily with Dr. Amy Zahn and her family and can no longer feel his scars.

“Holiday Wishes is another way in which the Petco Foundation invests in incredible organizations and communities that are committed to lifesaving,” said Petco Foundation executive director Susanne Kogut. “We want every animal to spendthe holiday season with a family, and through Holiday Wishes, we hope to increase this possibility each year.”

The story of Hercules was just one of the many heart-warming stories of survival submitted by animal welfare organizations across the country. The Petco Foundation made holiday wishes come true for a total of 33 organizations that were chosen as winners, based on the impact of the organization’s overall work and their success story. The Foundation’s Holiday Wishes campaign celebrates the tireless efforts of staff and volunteers across the country who are committed to saving the lives of animals year round. Grant winners include:

Grand Prize $100,000 Winner:

Second Place $50,000 Winners:

  • Angels Among Us Pet Rescue (Alpharetta, Ga.) in honor of Devin, a cat saved and given a customized set of wheels to aid the mobility of his paralyzed legs
  • Willamette Humane Society (Salem, Ore.) in honor of Coco, a cancer-stricken dog adopted after raising her 13 puppies in foster care after being abandoned

Third Place $25,000 Winners:

  • Animal Welfare Association of New Jersey (Voorhees, N.J.)
  • Brooke’s Legacy Animal Rescue, Inc. (Naples, Fla.)
  • Lee County Domestic Animal Services (Fort Myers, Fla.)
  • Stray Rescue of St. Louis (St Louis, Mo.)
  • Yavapai Humane Society (Prescott, Ariz.)

Fourth Place $10,000 Winners:

  • Animal Care & Control Team
  • Arizona Cattle Dog Rescue
  • Community Animal Welfare Society
  • Ghetto Rescue Foundation
  • Green Dogs Unleashed
  • Justin Bartlett Foundation (aka Justin Bartlett Animal Rescue)
  • Lenawee Humane Society
  • Michigan Humane Society
  • Red Bucket Equine Rescue
  • Treasured Friends

Fifth Place $5,000 Winners:

  • Angel of Hope Animal Rescue
  • Angel’s Hope
  • Animal Protection Center of Southeastern MA
  • Animal Rescue Volunteers
  • For Animals, Inc.
  • Friends of the Shelter Dogs
  • Humane Society of Tampa Bay
  • Mid-Atlantic Pug Rescue
  • N.B.S. Animal Rescue
  • PACA/AAR
  • Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society (PAWS)
  • Recycled Doggies, Inc.
  • Red Barn Rabbit Rescue
  • South County Cats
  • Touched by an Animal

Each of the winning organizations will receive checks from the Petco Foundation in the next two weeks, just in time to save more animals in need this holiday season. Grant money will be used at the discretion of the winners for needs such as facility upgrades or expansions, adoption event support and animal care.

For more information on the Petco Foundation Holiday Wishes Grant Campaign, and to read the winning stories, visit www.petco.com/holidaywishes. Join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram or by using the campaign hashtag, #HolidayWishes2014. For more information on the Petco Foundation, visit www.petcofoundation.org.

###


ABOUT PETCO & THE PETCO FOUNDATION
Petco is a leading pet specialty retailer that focuses on nurturing the powerful relationship between people and pets. We do this by providing the products, services, advice and experiences that keep pets physically fit, mentally alert, socially engaged and emotionally happy. Everything we do is guided by our vision for Healthier Pets. Happier People. Better World. We operate more than 1,300 Petco locations across the U.S., Mexico and Puerto Rico, including more than 100 Unleashed by Petco locations, a smaller format neighborhood shop; nine Pooch Hotel destinations for pet daycare, boarding and spa services; and petco.com. The Petco Foundation, an independent nonprofit organization, has raised more than $125 million since it was created in 1999 to help promote and improve the welfare of companion animals. In conjunction with the Foundation, we work with and support thousands of local animal welfare groups across the country and, through in-store adoption events, help find homes for more than 350,000 animals every year.


ABOUT HALO, PURELY FOR PETS®
For over 30 years, Halo, Purely for Pets® has created holistic pet products of uncompromising quality. Halo, America’s Best Loved Holistic Brand, believes nutrition is the single most important factor in the quality of a pet’s life. Our holistic diets use WHOLE meat, never "meat meal" of any kind. Plus, when you choose Halo, we feed it forward, donating a bowl to shelters every time you buy — over 1.5 million bowls annually, in partnership with Freekibble.com. Halo sponsors the Humane Society of the United States, GreaterGood.org, and many more animal rescue efforts. Halo’s natural dog food, natural cat food, treats, supplements and grooming products are available at Petco, Sprouts, PetSmart Canada, other fine pet specialty and natural food stores, Amazon.com and Chewy.com.

CONTACT
Kimberly Oulton, Edelman for Petco Foundation
650-762-2968
kimberly.oulton@edelman.com

Feeding both Halo canned and dry formulas

Posted by & filed under Articles, Halo, Pet Care Advice.

by Dr. Donna Spector

I recommend that pets eat a combination of dry and canned food every day.  Their bodies are made of 75% water.  Some pets rarely drink enough water to support excellent hydration and organ function so I recommend at least 25% of a pet’s daily calories come from canned food.   

Should you want to mix Halo wet and dry food for your pet daily or occasionally, below are suggestions for balanced proportions providing extra hydration and variety without over feeding.

Dr Donna Spector

Dog: How to replace ¼ cup dry with wet

1/4 cup
Wholesome Lamb

lamb dry dog
Replace with
replace with

4 oz.
Wholesome Lamb

lamb can dog

1/4 cup
Wild Salmon

dry salmon dog
Replace with
replace with

4 oz.
Succulent Salmon

dog salmon wet

1/4 cup
Wholesome Chicken

dry chicken dog
Replace with
replace with

5.5oz
Wholesome Chicken

dog chicken wet

1/4 cup
Grain-free
Hearty Surf n’ Turf

dog surf n turf dry
Replace with
replace with

3 oz.
Grain-free
Spot’s Choice
Turkey & Chickpea

dog turkey chickpea wet

1/4 cup
Small Breed Chicken

small breed chicken dry
Replace with
replace with

5.5 oz.
Wholesome Chicken

dog chicken wet

Cat: How to replace ¼ cup dry with wet

1/4 cup
Wholesome Chicken

cat chicken dry
Replace with
replace with

4.5 oz.
Wholesome Chicken

can chicken cat

1/4 cup
Wild Salmon

cat dry salmon
Replace with
replace with

4 oz.
Succulent Salmon

cat salmon wet

1/4 cup
Wholesome Turkey

cat turkey dry
Replace with
replace with

4.5 oz.
Wholesome Turkey

can turkey wet

1/4 cup
Grain-Free
Hearty Chicken

cat chicken grain free dry
Replace with
replace with

4.5 oz.
Wholesome Chicken

cat chick wet

1/4 cup
Grain-Free
Hearty Chicken

cat chicken grain free dry
Replace with
replace with

3 oz.
Spot’s Pate Chicken

can pate chicken cat

1/4 cup
Seafood Medley

cat seafood medley dry
Replace with
replace with

4 oz.
Spot’s Pate Whitefish

can pate whitefish cat


Note: Feeding both dry and canned Halo formulations is not necessary to meet a pet’s daily nutritional needs. This recommendation represents Dr. Donna Spector’s feeding preference for optimal pet health.

ABOUT HALO, PURELY FOR PETS®
For over 30 years, Halo, Purely for Pets® has created holistic pet products of uncompromising quality. Halo, America’s Best Loved Holistic Brand, believes nutrition is the single most important factor in the quality of a pet’s life. Our holistic diets use WHOLE meat, never "meat meal" of any kind. Plus, when you choose Halo, we feed it forward, donating a bowl to shelters every time you buy — over 1.5 million bowls annually, in partnership with Freekibble.com. Halo sponsors the Humane Society of the United States, GreaterGood.org, and many more animal rescue efforts. Halo’s natural dog food, natural cat food, treats, supplements and grooming products are available at Petco, Sprouts, PetSmart Canada, other fine pet specialty and natural food stores, Amazon.com and Chewy.com.